Transforming Agriculture in a Warming World: Reflections on Civil Society Strategies

Paper

Transforming Agriculture in a Warming World: Reflections on Civil Society Strategies

By Shefali Sharma (Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy) with Tobias Reichert (Germanwatch)

Overview
We are witnessing the impacts of climate change on agriculture today. Adverse weather patterns such as drought, floods, and erratic rain are becoming more frequent in many countries and increasingly impacting farmers’ abilities to respond to these changes and produce food.

Impacts of climate change observed today are particularly alarming given that governments are far from reaching a binding global agreement at the UNFCCC to limit global warming to no more than a 2° C temperature rise. The necessity to act now to address food security and agriculture adaptation in the midst of the climate crisis has never been more urgent. Special attention must be given to small farmers, landless labourers and communities dependent on rural agricultural production, as they are some of the most marginalized constituencies in virtually every country.

At the same time, efforts to strengthen the Right to food have never been greater, even as we face an unprecedented level of landgrabs in the post-colonial era and food price volatility. The Committee on World Food Security approved the Voluntary Guidelines on the Responsible Governance of Tenure of Land, Fisheries and Forests in the Context of National Food Security in May; and a roadmap has been agreed in developing the Principles for Responsible Agriculture Investments (RAI). The UN Special Rapporteur on the Right to food has helped elevate the importance of the Right to food in global food crises response and addressing food price volatility, global trade treaties and climate change. The year 2014 marks the tenth anniversary of the Voluntary Guidelines on the Right to food and the Special Rapporteur is discussing with social movements, NGOs and governments how we should review its implementation over the last ten years. This is particularly important given that we are on the brink of a second food crisis within four years of the first one. Much of the progress made on reducing hunger was made prior to 2007-2008 and not since the first food crisis, according to the State of Food Insecurity in the World Report 2012. As many as 875 million people still continue to suffer from hunger today.

...


Please download document below for full paper.

Author
By Shefali Sharma (Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy) with Tobias Reichert (Germanwatch)
Number of Pages
6